A simple vegetable brush can become so much more

Never underestimate the appeal of seemingly ordinary household objects as play objects for children. In fact, they remain some of the most reliable toys to add to a play environment to keep a young child cognitively engaged. Toys should be simple in order to stimulate a child’s imagination. According to Magda Gerber, "passive toys = active babies." So how can a vegetable brush become so alluring to older infants and toddlers?

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Be free and easy without tummy time

I realize by writing this, I'm going completely going against the grain on what most pediatricians say and what most parents do... But, my belief in natural gross motor development is too strong. (And Dr. Emmi Pikler's research is too compelling.) So, please read the following with an open mind!

RIE® practitioners have hundreds upon thousands of hours of experience observing infants without intervening in their natural movement. As a result, we commence every Certified Parent-Infant Guidance™ Course with one rule: please start the class by placing your babies on their backs. Why? 

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Three ways your baby benefits by removing the bouncer

One of the things that adults resort to is the belief that they have to guide the gross motor development of infants and toddlers. I have seen it over and over, and every time, I shudder. It is “anti-nature” at its core. The underlying belief is that infants and toddlers need our guidance to do what they are intended to do: sit up, crawl, and walk. This feeds right into the problem that adults view babies as helpless, incapable of learning without our assistance, and without intrinsic self-motivation. Rather than trusting the natural development process, we force it along....

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Why it’s difficult to watch (some) parents at the playground

Recently, I went to the playground with my friends and their child. While there, I saw a lot of things that caused me discomfort. I saw a parent putting his child top of a play structure with stairs leading up to a short slide (not more than a few feet of the ground). The child immediately started to cry. After spending almost an hour there, I realized that these types of interactions were relatively common: adults putting toddlers on play equipment like bikes, slides, and stairs when the children have no expressed interest in them. In most cases, the children are also not developmentally ready for it.

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